Crysis 3

Players: 1 Offliner, 4-16 Online
Publisher: Electronic Arts
Genres: Action, First-person Shooter
Release Date: June 20, 2013
Developer: Crytek
MSRP: $59.99
Platforms:
Return to the fight as Prophet, the Nanosuit soldier on a quest to rediscover his humanity and exact brutal revenge. Adapt on the fly with the stealth and armor abilities of your unique Nanosuit as you battle through the seven wonders of New York’s Liberty Dome.

The Crysis series may be a victim of its own reputation. “Can it run Crysis?” is still a joke 6 years later, despite the fact that consumer technology has largely caught up with the franchise. Even if the sequel was a quality shooter in its own right, all of the focus remains squarely on the visuals.

To be fair though, it is a very pretty game.

PROS Production values, Multiplayer
CONS Plot, Monotonous single-player campaign
WTF?! The dancing soldiers Easter egg

The CELL Corporation has more or less conquered the planet Earth in the intervening years between Crysis 2 and 3. New York City is now an I Am Legend fusion of architecture and forest, as the company’s mysterious dome keeps out the rebels that would threaten their monopoly of the world’s energy supply. Or is the nanodome trying to keep something in? Either way, the unstable killing machine Prophet will not stand for this, so he takes off on yet another adventure to reenact the film Predator.

Be very, very quiet. I’m hunting wabbits.

Truth be told, there is a lot of potential in the premise. The game plays on the modern fears of the energy crisis and paranoia about the rise of corporatocracies in order to build up its setting, but it ultimately fails to deliver on the setup in any meaningful way. All of the faceless soldiers are evil, the aliens are genocidal, and unlimited resources can be generated as if by magic. It’s a wasted plot.

Furthermore, the characters do their best to undermine any momentum the events could have generated. Even if Prophet and his sidekick Psycho agree on a course of action, they still find someway to fight about it, even as the head of the very resistance movement you are attempting to aid takes every opportunity to insult you for wearing a Ceph nanosuit. However, the most egregious storytelling offense is the pathetically predictable first act plot twist, which is so blatantly telegraphed that it leaves a whole quarter of the game feeling empty. Overall, the plot is B-grade action movie, at best.

In other news, flamethrowers!

One of the biggest complaints leveled at Crysis 2 was that it did a poor job of disguising its inherent linearity. This time around, Crytek widened the hallways and placed more interesting battlefields between them, in order to facilitate the illusion of choice. The result is a title that push you from point A to point B, but lets you feel like you took your own route there. More importantly, it also opens up a number of opportunities for creative violence.

All of the nanosuit abilities return–armor, cloaking, super strength, etc.–but Prophet also has a new toy this time around: a high tech bow. Whether you blame The Hunger Games or The Avengers, bows and arrows are the go-to weapon these days, and Crysis wastes no time throwing itself into the same waters as Far Cry 3 or the upcoming Tomb Raider. Stalking your prey as an invisible monster bristling with silent arrows of instant death is an empowering experience, especially when you can mark targets through the walls from 50 yards away.

This should have been the video game tie-in for pixar’s brave.

The core gameplay is immensely satisfying. Prophet can armor up and go full Rambo, sneak silently across higher ground while picking off sentries with arrows, or just pull a Solid Snake and CQC everyone. However, the power fantasy is somewhat diminished by the monotony that sets in after a short while. The campaign only lasts about 7 hours (over 7 missions), but you will doing the same thing in nearly every encounter. There aren’t any Call of Duty “water cooler moments,” nor any novel shifts in gameplay to break up the proceedings. The core of the game is solid, but the single-player lacks the addictive quality of the better shooters on the market.

The one thing Crysis 3 does have is a budget. You can tell from the moment you turn the game on that this is the video game equivalent of a Summer blockbuster, as the moody orchestral score gives way to a cinematic so detailed that you can count the individual scratches on Prophet’s suit. The detail in every character model, environment, and musical track is astounding, even on consoles. Halo 4 may have raised the bar for graphics on a home system, but Crytek has utterly shattered that benchmark. In addition, Ceph weaponry actually feels alien, unlike the Promethean firearms.

Seriously though, aliens are jerks.

If Crysis 3 shares anything else with 343 Industry’s first project, it is that the multiplayer suite shores up a lot of the weaknesses of the campaign. Simply put, the multiplayer on offer here is a blast. Call of Duty has the community, Battlefield has the vehicles, and Team Fortress 2 has the free, but Crysis 3 has the fun. It is interesting to note that Crytek has publically stated their desire to transition to an entirely free-to-play model for future releases, as the effort put forth here speaks to a commitment to quality that would instantly jettison them to the head of the pack with F2P shooters like Tribes: Ascend and Blacklight Retribution.

The secret to the multiplayer is its tightly crafted stick-and-carrot setup. Like most online first-persons shooters, there is a progression of experience points, unlocks, and load-out customization. However, whereas many titles start first-time players out with only a pistol and the clothes on their backs, Crysis 3 lets newbies feel empowered from the beginning. The interplay between stealth, armor, and tactics is easily grasped by players of any experience level, with the promise of improvement held out as an encouraging reward, instead of a necessary step to basic survival. Combine this with 8 unique gameplay modes, a good batch of dynamic maps, and world-class visuals, and you have a feature set that can compete with the other AAA first-person shooters on the market.

Wild Pokémon may be hiding in the tall grass!

In the interest of full disclosure, I should probably mention that this review is a bit late because I couldn’t stop playing the multiplayer long enough to write it. In fact, the only reason that you are able to read this right now is that the HDMI port on my PS3 suddenly stopped working altogether. I don’t want to imply that Crysis 3 was so powerful it melted my console, but I think you can draw your own conclusions.

At the end of the day, Crysis 3 is a satisfying confluence of features and options. Its single-player mode lacks the personality and variety to stand out from the impressive crop of recent first-person shooters, but the multiplayer experience is a strong contender for the best competitive destination of this moment in time. Oh, and the game looks beautiful. Of course it does.

A copy of the game was purchased for review purposes and was completed in about 7 hours, with an additional 7 hours spent with multiplayer. The title was played on PS3, but is also available for Xbox 360 and PC.

Also, follow me on Twitter @austinyorski (please).

7/10

Crysis 3 Review

Predator meets The Simpsons Movie.
avatar

Austin Yorski

Austin Yorski is a jack-of-all-trades around BT. He goes by Austin or Yorski (but not both) and has a degree in literature/religion from Florida State University. Also, he can collect all 120 stars in Super Mario 64 whilst blindfolded.

More Posts - Twitter

  1. February 24, 2013 at 03:22am
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +2 (from 8 votes)

    Crysis started out as a great series with a great story. Then in the sequels, Crytek decided story and continuity didn’t matter and focused entirely on delivering a visually appealing experience. The evidence of this is right there in this article’s summary:
    “Return to the fight as Prophet, the Nanosuit soldier on a quest to rediscover his humanity and exact brutal revenge.”
    However, you’re not Prophet. You’re AZTEC, the same person you played as in Crysis 2. Except —- Spoilers — at the end of Crysis 2, Prophet’s memories and personality, stored within the suit (the reason for this is never explained, another thing retconned into the series I guess) apparently take over Aztec’s mind. That doesn’t make the person in the suit not Aztec, though! Prophet is fucking dead, he shot himself in the head at the beginning of Crysis 2 to break his link with the suit Aztec is wearing (and see above, that apparently didn’t work). So the idea that the story is ‘Prophet rediscovering his humanity’ is garbage; I hope those are Crytek’s words and not yours, Austin.
    Furthermore, and equally retcon-tastic, is the fact that Psycho is apparently running around without a suit. A major plot point that was retconned into the series (completely absent in Crysis 1) was that oh, by the way, the suit doesn’t stop you from becoming mortally injured. It just fixes any wounds that aren’t instantly fatal; growing into damaged tissue, defibrilating the heart, and even replacing the function of entire organs. Because of this, anyone who’s injured while wearing the suit becomes, according to Crysis 2, incapable of living without the suit; a “dead man walking”. Psycho was the character you controlled during Crysis: Warhead, the side-sequel to Crysis 1. Are we supposed to believe that Psycho somehow completely avoided becoming seriously injured while fighting through Lingshan alongside Nomad and Prophet? Or did he miraculously grow new organs such that he can now, in Crysis 3, be running around without the suit?
    Hearing that they ‘made the corridors wider’ is encouraging from a gameplay perspective, as the thing that I loved most about the first game was that it had a lot of terrain you could cover, vehicles to use, and strategies you could make up yourself. And so despite the levels being linear, you had a lot of freedom within each level to play it the way you wanted, making it feel much more like a Far Cry 3 than a CoD. Whereas Crysis 2 got smashed upside the face with the CoD-bat, imitating much of its feel from the plot-hammeringly linear singleplayer story to its blatant ripoff of the COD multiplayer experience of leveling up, unlocking weapons, small maps. Crysis 1 had a lot of very large multiplayer maps, with areas your teams could capture from which you could then build a multitude of vehicles (including aircraft) to advance your ultimate goal of destroying the enemy base. Much more interesting than any of Crysis 2′s multiplayer modes. Are there any vehicles in Crysis 3′s multiplayer?

    • February 24, 2013 at 04:07am
      In response to Trogdor
      VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
      Rating: +6 (from 6 votes)

      There’s a lot of good stuff in that comment, so hopefully I can address everything.

      First, I believe Aztec was a soldier who died in the first game. Alcatraz, the protagonist of the second game, did become Prophet by the end, as the suit subsumed his personality. Crysis 3 eventually does deal with the Prophet/Alcatraz thing, but to say anymore is a bit spoiler-ish. Likewise, they do explain that Psycho was “skinned,” and therefore now able to live without his suit. None of these plot points are handled very well.

      There are a few vehicles in multiplayer, although I prefer not to use them. They make you a target :p

      • February 27, 2013 at 10:26pm
        In response to Austin Yorski
        VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
        Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

        Yeah, you’re right. I knew who I was talking about but confused the names.
        I guess I’ll have to play the game to find out how it came to be that Major Barnes (Prophet), who had been an honorable man up to that point and cared about the soldiers under his command, decided it was okay to take over Alcatraz, body and soul. Then again, I suppose the suit didn’t necessarily copy his personality verbatim. Prophet didn’t have the badass-itude in the first game that he picked up in 2 as the suit’s voice, and carried into 3.
        I was really a lot more interested to find out how Psycho is walking around without his suit; in Crysis 2, CELL tries to skin Alcatraz out of the suit but it is implied that the procedure will be fatal. In fact, they had so much trouble with the suit actively resisting the procedure that they were just about to shoot Alcatraz in the head, before they were interrupted by Tara Strickland at the last second.
        Assuming removing Psycho’s suit would be a similar experience, I find it hard to believe that they would bother to patch Psycho up after the procedure, not to mention replace any damaged organs the suit may have been compensating for. To leave this unexplained is kind of inexcusable when it was such a major plot point in Crysis 2..
        Anyway, thanks for taking the time to reply Austin. Hearing that they put vehicles back in the multiplayer is encouraging. I might just have to forgive 2′s transgressions and get 3, though I’ll probably wait until it’s on sale on Steam.
        One more question though, what about interaction with the environment? In Crysis 1, there were a lot of buildings that were made up of individual pieces; You could pick up an enemy soldier and throw him through a wall… drive a car off a ramp and have it sail through the air, then crash through a roof. You could knock down a tree and have it fall on an enemy, or kill a lookout in a tower by knocking the tower out from under him.
        It was this kind of creative carnage that really made the first game special to me and separated it from every other shooter out there. It was completely absent in 2, aside from picking up objects and throwing them. Is there any of this to be found in 3?

  2. February 23, 2013 at 08:44pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +4 (from 4 votes)

    I rather not melt my PC, thank you very much…

  3. February 23, 2013 at 08:19pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +2 (from 6 votes)

    I totally didn’t click on this page because the teaser line mentioned the Simpsons. Totally. And I totally didn’t play and beat the Simpsons Movie the Game. Totally.

  4. February 23, 2013 at 04:40pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: -4 (from 14 votes)

    I rented this. Beat it in about 6 hours. No desire to play it again. Just like Metal Gear Rising.

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Crysis 3: The Lost Island Coming This June

Posted by [ 10 months, 2 weeks ]

Once again the Crysis series is going island hopping.

Crysis 3 is AWESOME!

Posted by [ 1 year, 1 month ]

Badass weapons, killer graphics, and a talking suit. This game has everything!

Crysis 3 Review

Posted by [ 1 year, 1 month ]

Predator meets The Simpsons Movie.

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Either way, aliens blow up good.

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Posted by [ 1 year, 5 months ]

Admit it, Crytek, this series should be called CrySES now.

Receive Crysis for Free if you Pre-Order Crysis 3

Posted by [ 1 year, 5 months ]

EA is giving out Crysis pro-bono if you pre-order today.

Crysis 3: The Lost Island Coming This June

Posted By about 10 months, 2 weeks ago

Once again the Crysis series is going island hopping.

Final '7 Wonders of Crysis 3' Video Heralds the End of Days

Posted By about 1 year, 2 months ago

It’s the end of the world as we know and I feel fine.

The Fifth Wonder of Crysis 3 Stands Revealed

Posted By about 1 year, 2 months ago

What is the “Perfect Weapon”?

Experience the 3rd & 4th Wonders of Crysis 3

Posted By about 1 year, 2 months ago

Dive deeper into the world of Crysis 3.

Crysis 3 Thinks Explosive Arrows are Stealthy

Posted By about 1 year, 3 months ago

Either way, aliens blow up good.

EA Teams up with Hollywood for Crysis 3 Promotion

Posted By about 1 year, 4 months ago

Experience the 7 Wonders of Crysis 3.

Crysis 3 Gameplay Trailer Suits Up

Posted By about 1 year, 5 months ago

Admit it, Crytek, this series should be called CrySES now.

Receive Crysis for Free if you Pre-Order Crysis 3

Posted By about 1 year, 5 months ago

EA is giving out Crysis pro-bono if you pre-order today.

A Crysis 3 Producer Wants to Walk You Through the Game's Multiplayer

Posted By about 1 year, 6 months ago

Are you ready to be a hunter?

Latest Crysis 3 Trailer is Short But Very Sweet

Posted By about 1 year, 6 months ago

Once against Crytek seems to be trying to redefine the term “good graphics.”

Crysis 3 Review

Crysis 3 Review

The Crysis series may be a victim of its own reputation. “Can it run Crysis?” is still a joke 6 years later, despite the fact that consumer technology has largely caught up with the franchise. Even if the sequel was a quality shooter in its own right, all of the focus remains squarely on the visuals.

To be fair though, it is a very pretty game.

PROS Production values, Multiplayer
CONS Plot, Monotonous single-player campaign
WTF?! The dancing soldiers Easter egg

The CELL Corporation has more or less conquered the planet Earth in the intervening years between Crysis 2 and 3. New York City is now an I Am Legend fusion of architecture and forest, as the company’s mysterious dome keeps out the rebels that would threaten their monopoly of the world’s energy supply. Or is the nanodome trying to keep something in? Either way, the unstable killing machine Prophet will not stand for this, so he takes off on yet another adventure to reenact the film Predator.

Be very, very quiet. I’m hunting wabbits.

Truth be told, there is a lot of potential in the premise. The game plays on the modern fears of the energy crisis and paranoia about the rise of corporatocracies in order to build up its setting, but it ultimately fails to deliver on the setup in any meaningful way. All of the faceless soldiers are evil, the aliens are genocidal, and unlimited resources can be generated as if by magic. It’s a wasted plot.

Furthermore, the characters do their best to undermine any momentum the events could have generated. Even if Prophet and his sidekick Psycho agree on a course of action, they still find someway to fight about it, even as the head of the very resistance movement you are attempting to aid takes every opportunity to insult you for wearing a Ceph nanosuit. However, the most egregious storytelling offense is the pathetically predictable first act plot twist, which is so blatantly telegraphed that it leaves a whole quarter of the game feeling empty. Overall, the plot is B-grade action movie, at best.

In other news, flamethrowers!

One of the biggest complaints leveled at Crysis 2 was that it did a poor job of disguising its inherent linearity. This time around, Crytek widened the hallways and placed more interesting battlefields between them, in order to facilitate the illusion of choice. The result is a title that push you from point A to point B, but lets you feel like you took your own route there. More importantly, it also opens up a number of opportunities for creative violence.

All of the nanosuit abilities return–armor, cloaking, super strength, etc.–but Prophet also has a new toy this time around: a high tech bow. Whether you blame The Hunger Games or The Avengers, bows and arrows are the go-to weapon these days, and Crysis wastes no time throwing itself into the same waters as Far Cry 3 or the upcoming Tomb Raider. Stalking your prey as an invisible monster bristling with silent arrows of instant death is an empowering experience, especially when you can mark targets through the walls from 50 yards away.

This should have been the video game tie-in for pixar’s brave.

The core gameplay is immensely satisfying. Prophet can armor up and go full Rambo, sneak silently across higher ground while picking off sentries with arrows, or just pull a Solid Snake and CQC everyone. However, the power fantasy is somewhat diminished by the monotony that sets in after a short while. The campaign only lasts about 7 hours (over 7 missions), but you will doing the same thing in nearly every encounter. There aren’t any Call of Duty “water cooler moments,” nor any novel shifts in gameplay to break up the proceedings. The core of the game is solid, but the single-player lacks the addictive quality of the better shooters on the market.

The one thing Crysis 3 does have is a budget. You can tell from the moment you turn the game on that this is the video game equivalent of a Summer blockbuster, as the moody orchestral score gives way to a cinematic so detailed that you can count the individual scratches on Prophet’s suit. The detail in every character model, environment, and musical track is astounding, even on consoles. Halo 4 may have raised the bar for graphics on a home system, but Crytek has utterly shattered that benchmark. In addition, Ceph weaponry actually feels alien, unlike the Promethean firearms.

Seriously though, aliens are jerks.

If Crysis 3 shares anything else with 343 Industry’s first project, it is that the multiplayer suite shores up a lot of the weaknesses of the campaign. Simply put, the multiplayer on offer here is a blast. Call of Duty has the community, Battlefield has the vehicles, and Team Fortress 2 has the free, but Crysis 3 has the fun. It is interesting to note that Crytek has publically stated their desire to transition to an entirely free-to-play model for future releases, as the effort put forth here speaks to a commitment to quality that would instantly jettison them to the head of the pack with F2P shooters like Tribes: Ascend and Blacklight Retribution.

The secret to the multiplayer is its tightly crafted stick-and-carrot setup. Like most online first-persons shooters, there is a progression of experience points, unlocks, and load-out customization. However, whereas many titles start first-time players out with only a pistol and the clothes on their backs, Crysis 3 lets newbies feel empowered from the beginning. The interplay between stealth, armor, and tactics is easily grasped by players of any experience level, with the promise of improvement held out as an encouraging reward, instead of a necessary step to basic survival. Combine this with 8 unique gameplay modes, a good batch of dynamic maps, and world-class visuals, and you have a feature set that can compete with the other AAA first-person shooters on the market.

Wild Pokémon may be hiding in the tall grass!

In the interest of full disclosure, I should probably mention that this review is a bit late because I couldn’t stop playing the multiplayer long enough to write it. In fact, the only reason that you are able to read this right now is that the HDMI port on my PS3 suddenly stopped working altogether. I don’t want to imply that Crysis 3 was so powerful it melted my console, but I think you can draw your own conclusions.

At the end of the day, Crysis 3 is a satisfying confluence of features and options. Its single-player mode lacks the personality and variety to stand out from the impressive crop of recent first-person shooters, but the multiplayer experience is a strong contender for the best competitive destination of this moment in time. Oh, and the game looks beautiful. Of course it does.

A copy of the game was purchased for review purposes and was completed in about 7 hours, with an additional 7 hours spent with multiplayer. The title was played on PS3, but is also available for Xbox 360 and PC.

Also, follow me on Twitter @austinyorski (please).

7/10

Crysis 3 Review

Predator meets The Simpsons Movie.
  1. February 24, 2013 at 03:22am
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +2 (from 8 votes)

    Crysis started out as a great series with a great story. Then in the sequels, Crytek decided story and continuity didn’t matter and focused entirely on delivering a visually appealing experience. The evidence of this is right there in this article’s summary:
    “Return to the fight as Prophet, the Nanosuit soldier on a quest to rediscover his humanity and exact brutal revenge.”
    However, you’re not Prophet. You’re AZTEC, the same person you played as in Crysis 2. Except —- Spoilers — at the end of Crysis 2, Prophet’s memories and personality, stored within the suit (the reason for this is never explained, another thing retconned into the series I guess) apparently take over Aztec’s mind. That doesn’t make the person in the suit not Aztec, though! Prophet is fucking dead, he shot himself in the head at the beginning of Crysis 2 to break his link with the suit Aztec is wearing (and see above, that apparently didn’t work). So the idea that the story is ‘Prophet rediscovering his humanity’ is garbage; I hope those are Crytek’s words and not yours, Austin.
    Furthermore, and equally retcon-tastic, is the fact that Psycho is apparently running around without a suit. A major plot point that was retconned into the series (completely absent in Crysis 1) was that oh, by the way, the suit doesn’t stop you from becoming mortally injured. It just fixes any wounds that aren’t instantly fatal; growing into damaged tissue, defibrilating the heart, and even replacing the function of entire organs. Because of this, anyone who’s injured while wearing the suit becomes, according to Crysis 2, incapable of living without the suit; a “dead man walking”. Psycho was the character you controlled during Crysis: Warhead, the side-sequel to Crysis 1. Are we supposed to believe that Psycho somehow completely avoided becoming seriously injured while fighting through Lingshan alongside Nomad and Prophet? Or did he miraculously grow new organs such that he can now, in Crysis 3, be running around without the suit?
    Hearing that they ‘made the corridors wider’ is encouraging from a gameplay perspective, as the thing that I loved most about the first game was that it had a lot of terrain you could cover, vehicles to use, and strategies you could make up yourself. And so despite the levels being linear, you had a lot of freedom within each level to play it the way you wanted, making it feel much more like a Far Cry 3 than a CoD. Whereas Crysis 2 got smashed upside the face with the CoD-bat, imitating much of its feel from the plot-hammeringly linear singleplayer story to its blatant ripoff of the COD multiplayer experience of leveling up, unlocking weapons, small maps. Crysis 1 had a lot of very large multiplayer maps, with areas your teams could capture from which you could then build a multitude of vehicles (including aircraft) to advance your ultimate goal of destroying the enemy base. Much more interesting than any of Crysis 2′s multiplayer modes. Are there any vehicles in Crysis 3′s multiplayer?

    • February 24, 2013 at 04:07am
      In response to Trogdor
      VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
      Rating: +6 (from 6 votes)

      There’s a lot of good stuff in that comment, so hopefully I can address everything.

      First, I believe Aztec was a soldier who died in the first game. Alcatraz, the protagonist of the second game, did become Prophet by the end, as the suit subsumed his personality. Crysis 3 eventually does deal with the Prophet/Alcatraz thing, but to say anymore is a bit spoiler-ish. Likewise, they do explain that Psycho was “skinned,” and therefore now able to live without his suit. None of these plot points are handled very well.

      There are a few vehicles in multiplayer, although I prefer not to use them. They make you a target :p

      • February 27, 2013 at 10:26pm
        In response to Austin Yorski
        VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
        Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

        Yeah, you’re right. I knew who I was talking about but confused the names.
        I guess I’ll have to play the game to find out how it came to be that Major Barnes (Prophet), who had been an honorable man up to that point and cared about the soldiers under his command, decided it was okay to take over Alcatraz, body and soul. Then again, I suppose the suit didn’t necessarily copy his personality verbatim. Prophet didn’t have the badass-itude in the first game that he picked up in 2 as the suit’s voice, and carried into 3.
        I was really a lot more interested to find out how Psycho is walking around without his suit; in Crysis 2, CELL tries to skin Alcatraz out of the suit but it is implied that the procedure will be fatal. In fact, they had so much trouble with the suit actively resisting the procedure that they were just about to shoot Alcatraz in the head, before they were interrupted by Tara Strickland at the last second.
        Assuming removing Psycho’s suit would be a similar experience, I find it hard to believe that they would bother to patch Psycho up after the procedure, not to mention replace any damaged organs the suit may have been compensating for. To leave this unexplained is kind of inexcusable when it was such a major plot point in Crysis 2..
        Anyway, thanks for taking the time to reply Austin. Hearing that they put vehicles back in the multiplayer is encouraging. I might just have to forgive 2′s transgressions and get 3, though I’ll probably wait until it’s on sale on Steam.
        One more question though, what about interaction with the environment? In Crysis 1, there were a lot of buildings that were made up of individual pieces; You could pick up an enemy soldier and throw him through a wall… drive a car off a ramp and have it sail through the air, then crash through a roof. You could knock down a tree and have it fall on an enemy, or kill a lookout in a tower by knocking the tower out from under him.
        It was this kind of creative carnage that really made the first game special to me and separated it from every other shooter out there. It was completely absent in 2, aside from picking up objects and throwing them. Is there any of this to be found in 3?

  2. February 23, 2013 at 08:44pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +4 (from 4 votes)

    I rather not melt my PC, thank you very much…

  3. February 23, 2013 at 08:19pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +2 (from 6 votes)

    I totally didn’t click on this page because the teaser line mentioned the Simpsons. Totally. And I totally didn’t play and beat the Simpsons Movie the Game. Totally.

  4. February 23, 2013 at 04:40pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: -4 (from 14 votes)

    I rented this. Beat it in about 6 hours. No desire to play it again. Just like Metal Gear Rising.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Crysis 3 is AWESOME!

Posted in Video Games Awesome! [ 1 year, 1 month ]

Badass weapons, killer graphics, and a talking suit. This game has everything!

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