Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

Players: 1 Player Offline
Publisher: Namco Bandai
Genres: RPG
Release Date: January 22, 2013
Developer: Level 5, Studio Ghibli
MSRP: $59.99
Platforms:
Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch is an epic tale of a young boy, Oliver, who embarks on a journey to become a master magician and bring back his dead mother from the parallel world of Ni no Kuni. Along the way he encounters some extraordinary characters, many of whom become helpful allies.

Shinkara: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch, 9.6 out of 10 based on 29 ratings

A well-crafted JRPG mixed with Studio Ghibli style visuals seems like something only reserved for dreams. No need to keep pinching yourself because it’s real. In this episode Taylor looks at the beautiful Level-5 & Studio Ghibli collaboration, Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch!

Follow Taylor on Twitter: @TaylorsShelf
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Original Art: Ririkuto
Opening song: Incompetech.com
Logo design: @PyreHavoc

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Rating: 9.6/10 (29 votes cast)

Shinkara: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

A well-crafted JRPG mixed with Studio Ghibli style visuals seems like something only reserved for dreams. No need to keep pinching yourself because it's real. In this episode Taylor looks at the beautiful Level-5 & Studio Ghibli collaboration, Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch!

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Review

Is Ni No Kuni the title so many hoped it would be or has a seemingly cannot-fail mixing of creative forces done the unthinkable?
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Taylor Hoyt

Taylor’s love of the PSP flourished during his 1 year stay in South Korea. Whether it be on the subway, bus, or long walks on the beach, the PSP’s allure grew in Taylor’s heart. When he’s not playing games, he enjoys playing the guitar, making videos, and trying to learn the words to various KPOP songs. Favorite game of this generation: Uncharted 2: Among Thieves. Favorite game of all time: Persona 4.

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  1. January 30, 2013 at 03:09pm
    In response to Article
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    Well, it’s good to know a game that I wasn’t into RPGs. But looks like The Last Story and Ni No Kuni are the kind of RPG games that I want to give a try. Thanks dude.

    PS: you put Ponyo over Princess Mononoke? Don’t get me wrong, Ponyo is a cute/good movie and I like it. But still, well you know :p

  2. January 28, 2013 at 11:00pm
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    Loving this game

  3. January 19, 2013 at 04:47pm
    In response to Article
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    Rating: +1 (from 11 votes)

    WHY DO I NOT OWN A PS3!?!

    CURSES FOR THIS NOT BEING ON THE 360!!!!!!!!

  4. January 19, 2013 at 11:15am
    In response to Article
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    Rating: +3 (from 3 votes)

    It’s interesting that you mention Xenoblade since it looks like these two games are pretty much in complete contrast to each other, Xenoblade wanted to thrwo all the usual JRPG cliches out the window while Ni No Kuni emraces those and brings it into the new generation. From what I can tell though they seem to be equal in quality. YMMV of course.

  5. January 19, 2013 at 01:20am
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +5 (from 5 votes)

    Looks good and thank you for the review – now I feel like I did good when I pre-ordered it :)

  6. January 19, 2013 at 12:59am
    In response to Article
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    Rating: +6 (from 6 votes)

    I nearly flipped a god damn table when I opened Game Informer and saw they gave this game a 7. Glad to hear they we’re just being idiots again.

  7. January 18, 2013 at 10:00am
    In response to Article
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    Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)

    Is the translation to English good?

  8. January 18, 2013 at 05:35am
    In response to Article
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    Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

    I have high hopes for this game and at first did not pay attention toward this game 9 months when it was rumored but a friend of mine told me it was Studio Ghibli doing the concept art and the 2d animated cut scenes and it got may attention and had it on pre-order months in advance.

    Thank you for putting my concerns to rest and highlighting the points that are important about this game and I wanted to say “Thank You.”

    I did have one minor problem with the review but it is forgivable, Ghibli Studio was contracted to do a Playstation 1 game which was released I believe around the 2000′s, they did concept art and 2d intro scene, which I consider and hidden jem but kind of a pokemon clone, Jade Cocoon which was developed by Genki and Crave Entertainment company. I would recommend you check it out but i would warn you about it’s sequel, try the first that is my recommendation.

    Thank you for your time Taylor H. or anyone reading this opinion. Thank you again.

    • January 18, 2013 at 11:53am
      In response to klostmind
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      Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)

      I actually own Jade Cocoon and think it’s a great game! From what I understand they did the intro video and had someone do character designs, but they weren’t involved in the development as a whole to the degree in which they were with Ni no Kuni.

      That’s why I said they “never really” got into games and that this was their first “major” collaboration. Thank you for pointing that out though!

  9. January 18, 2013 at 01:06am
    In response to Article
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    Rating: +4 (from 4 votes)

    You mentioned Ponyo, but not Princess Mononoke??

    DAYM SHAME.

    • January 18, 2013 at 01:45am
      In response to ManWithGoodTaste
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      Rating: +3 (from 3 votes)

      Let’s not forget Nausica…and My Neighbor Totoro (actually if there’s a totoro in Ni no Kuni, that may make it a strong contender for the best RPG of the year in my book)

  10. January 17, 2013 at 10:23pm
    In response to Article
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    Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

    Great review. I’m totally going to get this game when it comes out, but I had a problem with the demo, dunno if it was me not knowing what to do or if it’s something that’s fixed on the retail version, buuuut… I get that when a boss prepares his ultimate attack, you have to block. But on the second boss of the demo, when I have two characters in my party, I realized that while I could have the character I’m currently controlling block, the other one would no, and take a lot of damage. I searched for a way to tell them to block too, but didn’t find it.

    Also, the demo being timed was a little on the bs side.

  11. January 17, 2013 at 07:45pm
    In response to Article
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    Rating: +3 (from 5 votes)

    And I thought Pokemon X and Y were the 100% 3D Pokemon games I’ve been yearning for since Pokemon Stadium, but after this review, I’m convinced THIS is the 3D Pokemon game I’ve been waiting for. Colisseum and XD were fine, but this one looks to be even bigger. Plus it even has the Pokemon anime formula of “Ash and pals befriend random strangers and help them with their requests, no matter how menial they may be, with the help of their Pokemon.”

    Like I’ve mentioned a couple of times in your Youtube Account, you are the bane of my wallet…for better or worse. Looks like I’ll have to rethink which games to pick up first.

  12. January 17, 2013 at 02:23pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +3 (from 5 votes)

    I really can’t wait for my preorder of Ni no Kuni to come in, and your review has me really looking forward to playing it.

  13. January 17, 2013 at 01:46pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +4 (from 4 votes)

    Spectacular review. That opening is great. I pre-ordered this from Amazon.ca so I’ll get a nice Exclusive Griffy Familiar and use this Hunter of the Skies and its fearsome Phantom Fangs to evolve your Griffy into the Griffrigerator. This is my most anticipated game of 2013. After putting well over 100 hours into Dragon Quest VIII I think I’m ready for Ni No Kuni.

    • January 17, 2013 at 01:54pm
      In response to Eagle7D8
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      Rating: +7 (from 7 votes)

      If you liked Dragon Quest VIII then you’ll love Ni no Kuni! I forgot to mention this in the review, but there’s an alchemy pot system in the game very similar to the one in DQ8.

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PS3 25-in-25: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

Posted by [ 5 months ]

If you’re a JRPG fan then this is one you absolutely shouldn’t miss.

Ni No Kuni is AWESOME! - Episode 2

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Time to continue our adventure into the world of Ni No Kuni!

Free DLC for Ni No Kuni Inbound in 2 Weeks

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Something new is on the way for Ni No Kuni in North America.

Ni No Kuni is AWESOME!

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A young boy named Oliver and his sidekick Drippy travel to another universe to save us all from destruction.

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Review

Posted by [ 1 year, 2 months ]

Is Ni No Kuni the title so many hoped it would be or has a seemingly cannot-fail mixing of creative forces done the unthinkable?

Shinkara: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

Posted by [ 1 year, 2 months ]

A well-crafted JRPG mixed with Studio Ghibli style visuals seems like something only reserved for dreams. No need to keep pinching yourself because it’s real. In this episode Taylor looks at the beautiful Level-5 & Studio Ghibli collaboration, Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch!

Latest Ni No Kuni Video Examines the Music of the Legenday Joe Hisaishi

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Game music fans you are in for a treat.

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May all your bacon burn.

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Our very own UK Content Editor Yousif A. gets hands on with the game that cast a Welshman as a fairy.

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There are few games I am currently looking forward to more than Ni no Kuni.

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Something new is on the way for Ni No Kuni in North America.

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Game music fans you are in for a treat.

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May all your bacon burn.

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There are few games I am currently looking forward to more than Ni no Kuni.

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The long, agonizing wait will be over soon…ish!

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Hayao Miyazaki’s first video game is coming to North America next year.

Ni no Kuni Has a Release Window

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The release window might not brighten your day, but another piece of news concerning the game will.

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Follow me on my journey as I chronicle my time with the Japanese version of Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch. Today, we get you caught up with the basics.

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This news hurt my heart a little bit.

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For those who just can’t stay away from this gorgeous-looking game, please enjoy these videos.

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Review

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Review

Shinkara: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch, 9.6 out of 10 based on 29 ratings

When Level-5 Inc. is at its best, the developer creates games that can match the best in the industry, as titles like Dark Cloud 2, Dragon Quest VIII, and Jeanne d’Arc prove. While not everything the developer touches turns to gold (as the White Knight Chronicles series and a number of the Inazuma Eleven titles unfortunately demonstrate), for the most part the company has a track record of excellence. No less can be said about Studio Ghibli, one of the universally acknowledged masters in the field of animation, so when the news first broke that the two would be joining forces its understandable many were excited. After all, the sky seemed to be the limit for the game that such a pairing might be capable of producing and now that it is finally being released internationally the question remains: Is Ni No Kuni the title so many have hoped it would be or has this seemingly cannot-fail mixing of creative forces done the unthinkable by actually failing?

PROS Story, Characters, Visuals, Combat, Soundtrack, English dub
CONS Enemy encounters too plentiful, Blocking/evading can be overly tricky
WTF?! Just how does Drippy keep that lamp lit all the time anyways?

A young boy named Oliver lives a bucolic existence in his seemingly plucked-right-out-of-the-fifties small town of Motorville. All appears well, but events soon conspire to rob Oliver of the most important person in his life: his mother. The fact that he is unwittingly partially responsible for this death only makes things worse and just as the young boy is about to sink into utter despair something miraculous happens: his tears cause one of his dolls to come to life. This is odd enough, but then the doll-turned-adorable-creature reveals that he is actually named Drippy and is the High Lord High of the Fairies. Drippy, as it turns out, comes from another world parallel to Earth known as Ni No Kuni and tells Oliver that he is in fact a wizard whose power is needed in Drippy’s world. For it seems that the land there is now under siege by a terrible being known as the Dark Djinn Shadar and that only Oliver, the ‘Pure-Hearted One’ of legend, can stop him. After being told that defeating Shadar might also allow Oliver to bring his mother back to life he agrees to help and soon sets off with Drippy at his side into the magical and beautiful world of Ni No Kuni where perils and delights aplenty await…

The actual plot that drives Ni No Kuni is a fairly straightforward affair that consists of any number of familiar tropes, as the above description should show, yet the delight of the game lies less in the story itself and more in the way it is told. There is so much craft and mastery present in the game that the fact that players might be able to guess many of the twists coming in advance is hardly important. It is similar to how an animated Disney movie can entertain a diverse audience even when they already know in advance there is going to be a happy ending before all is said and done. The same is true for Ni No Kuni and it is a game whose story falls as much into the category of fairy tale as it does fantasy epic. Additionally, for all that the story holds to a number of well-known tropes, Ni No Kuni is not afraid to use humor to shake things up at times. Drippy in particular has clearly been positioned as the breakout character of the game and it is a role he fills rather admirably. From his endearing accent, to his boisterous personality, right down to his occasional fourth wall bending side-comments, Drippy often threatens to steal the show whenever he is on screen. For those familiar with Dragon Quest VIII, Drippy will immediately bring to mind none other than Yangus and cor blimey if that is not a good thing. The fact that Ni No Kuni is careful to never take itself too seriously helps prevent it from turning into some sonorous, long-winded slog. What remains is instead a fantastical and fun journey into a world that lies just on the other side of one’s imagination.

Don’t worry Oliver you can take him. You have… a stick. A very small stick. *gulp*

In terms of gameplay, Ni No Kuni is very much a JRPG in the classic sense of the term and players can expect to travel across vast landscapes all connected by a primary overworld map, explore deep dungeons, interact with a multitude of NPCs, and, of course, battle countless enemies along the way. Indeed, Ni No Kuni is particularly old school to the point that I would consider this one of the game’s few flaws. Enemies are everywhere, both in dungeons and on the overworld, and while they are visible on the screen, between Oliver’s low running speed and the enemies tenacity upon spotting him, avoiding encounters can be more trouble than it is worth. Combine this with a respawn rate of less than 30 seconds and it is a recipe for a lot of fighting. Thankfully, once players have gained enough levels, significantly weaker enemies run from instead of towards you, which does ease returning to previous areas immensely. Also, even at its worst, Ni No Kuni is not nearly as overstuffed with an abundance of random encounters as any number of older RPGs from the 8-bit and 16-bit eras. Still, it can be a bit of anchor around the game’s neck at times and one that players should be prepared to accept beforehand.

Since fighting plays a big role in Ni No Kuni it is good thing the combat system featured in the game is both highly engaging and rather compelling. Battles play out in a style that comes across like a mixture of classic turn-based RPGs and a deliberately slower version of the Star Ocean/Tales systems with a healthy dose of Pokémon thrown in for good measure. During combat the game moves to separate field where players and enemies alike have a full range of movement and as such placement is very important. Certain attacks will only strike if the intended target is close enough and everything plays out in real-time. In addition to their own abilities, Oliver and his eventual companions can also bring up to three familiars with them into battle and any one of them can take his or her place in the fray at any time. While generally faster and stronger than their human masters, familiars do have some major limitations as well. Chief among these is a stamina bar that counts down for a familiar whenever it is called on to fight. Let the bar drop to zero and the familiar’s stats and speed will drop by half and it will be unable to use any special attacks. The fact that familiars and the character commanding them share the same life bar in turn makes such an occurrence dangerous to say the very least. Thankfully, a familiar’s stamina bar regenerates relatively quickly when not in active use and it is rarely an issue during more standard enemy encounters. The same is not true for Ni No Kuni’s often challenging boss battles though and players will need to make sure all familiars on the team are capable participants as a result.

Have I gotten across yet that the bosses are rather of the large sized variety?

There are over a hundred familiars in Ni No Kuni and while they have diverse forms and abilities they also all tend to come in three types: those who block attacks, those who can cancel attacks via attacks of their own, and those who can evade attacks altogether. Proper timing is the key for all three of these maneuvers being employed successfully (especially the last one) and during boss battles this aspect of combat becomes particularly vital to one’s continued survival. Which is why it is somewhat unfortunate that at times the game can move a little too fast for its own good on this front; the simple truth is that Ni No Kuni periodically expects a reaction time from players that some may find excessive. It is a problem that a more defensive strategy can counter, but this in turn can also lead to some battles dragging out more than they should. Another major component of battle in Ni No Kuni is that particularly well done attacks/ blocks/cancels/avoid will cause enemies to drop glowing balls of light called glims which can restore HP and MP. When players manage to combo an effective series of commands together this can trigger a gold glim to drop. Gold glims not only fully restore a character/familiar’s HP and MP they also let them use an ultra-powerful Miracle Move as well. Characters and familiars alike each have distinct Miracle Move and these can range from uber-powerful attacks capable of massive damage to an instant group heal that fully restores HP and buffs the party as well.

Players can only control one character at a time and the AI for the rest of the party is more than adequate at its job. When the need to switch control does arrive, the game is courteous enough to pause combat and the same is true when designating a target for an attack. It is small advantage, but one a player will need all the same because while the story of Ni No Kuni may be like a fairy tale suitable for all ages this does not mean enemies are going to take it easy on Oliver and friends. Every time a new area is entered players will have to contend with a new set of baddies whose levels are almost always significantly higher than their own. Additionally, the last third of the game in particular sees a major spike in difficulty that may catch the unwary off-guard. Boss encounters in particular can be devastating for the ill-prepared player and those who just try to button mash their way through such encounters should expect many a full-party wipe before all is said and one. The game does feature both easy and normal difficulty modes and players can switch between them at any time outside of combat but even the former setting does not mean that one can sleep walk their way through battle. Ni No Kuni is challenging, no question, but it is mostly of the fair variety; players who pay attention, think about their party make-up beforehand, and keep up on the latest armor, accessories, spells, etc. will find a game that pushes back but not so hard as to ever become unduly frustrating.

Combat in Ni No Kuni requires both quick thinking and quick reactions.

Ni No Kuni is far more forgiving outside of combat. The game’s overworld can seem almost dauntingly vast at times but the game is always prepared to guide players to their next required designation via a well laid out map system. Side-quests in Ni No Kuni are as plentiful as they are diverse and in addition to the rewards given out by the quest-givers directly players also earn stamps. These stamps are used to fill up cards which can then be traded in turn for useful abilities ranging from a greater drop rate of healing glims in battle to a faster running speed on the world map. These enhancements can often make a big difference in the game and they add a nice secondary layer of motivation to the sidequests in the game. On a similar note, rarely have I seen side-quests so well integrated into the larger story of a game. This is accomplished by having many of them revolve around repairing the broken hearts of people touched by directly by Shadar. It is great touch that really sells the level of peril and danger the world of Ni No Kuni is living in the shadow of. The fact that the only way to cure these hearts is to draw upon the strong feelings of other NPCs in the game only further reinforces the overall themes driving Ni No Kuni’s narrative. Additionally, a wide variety of side-content beyond official side-quests are further present from a casino filled with mini-games to the ghost of a wizard looking to quiz players on the lore of the land to a plethora of deviously hidden treasure chests. That is to say nothing of filling out one’s collection of familiars or hunting down the hundreds of special enemies who have a bounty on their heads (and whose defeat also grants stamps).

Yet, for all of the plentiful content available in Ni No Kuni, few pleasures can exceed the simple joy that comes from exploring the game’s vast and beautiful world. As I said earlier, the story and combat system are reason enough to keep playing, but the desire to see what lies just around the corner can easily serve as all the motivation one needs to complete Ni No Kuni. I could throw superlative after superlative at this game’s visuals and I would still be underselling the sheer level of grandeur and beauty present throughout. This may just be the single most gorgeous game I have ever played and it is not just the art style or use of cel-shading either. The beauty of Ni No Kuni lies as much in the myriad little background elements and seemingly endless array of subtle character animations present as bigger, flashier elements–the main characters in particular, as just seeing them move through this world can be astounding. They react to the smallest of stimuli and/or changes in the environment around them to the point it is like they are moving through a real, living world as opposed to just some arbitrary space dreamed up by a programmer on a computer. Even average NPCs on the street feature an impressive range of nuance in terms of detail and are so emotive that one can tell the change in them from broken-hearted to normal by watching their faces alone.

Notice all the little details in this image including Oliver’s change in outfit which is just one of many he will end up wearing.

To put it another way: in a game that features a number of marvelous fully animated cutscenes from Studio Ghibli it is remarkable just how close the moment to moment graphics come to matching the visual quality of these sequences. Something I have always been particularly fond of is towns or cities in video games which feel like they could be real places. In the past, Level-5 has been particularly skilled at creating such locales (the central town in Dark Cloud 2 stands out as one my all-time favorite examples of such) and they have outdone themselves on this front in Ni No Kuni. Not only are there dozens of towns of this level of quality present but the entire world in the game has a robust and lived in feel that helps give a wealth of additional personality to the whole game. BT does not use a review scale requiring that the individual elements of a game each be given a distinct score, but if we did I would easily give the graphics in Ni No Kuni a 10. This is more than just an incredible looking game; in my opinion it is the new standard against which every other game produced for the current console generation must be measured against in terms of graphics going forward. Period.

Ni No Kuni is no slouch in the sound department either. The game features both a newly recorded English language vocal track and the original Japanese vocals and the English dub is simply first rate. A diverse cast of both familiar and new voices are present and all do impeccable work at bringing their characters to life. Steffan Rhodri (who previously has mostly done smaller parts in the US and perhaps is best known for his work as Dave in the UK sitcom Gavin and Stacey) provides the English voice of Drippy and I want to especially single him out for his remarkable performance. As I said previously, Drippy is a central character in Ni No Kuni in more ways than one and a flat performance of his part would have been disastrous for the game as a whole. Thankfully, Rhodri completely nails the character and really brings that extra bit of charm and humor needed to make Drippy shine. Meanwhile, Ni No Kuni’s music is every bit the triumph one would expect from frequent Ghibli-partner Joe Hisaishi. He has produced a score that simply soars and effectively reinforces the emotions of whatever a particular scene may be aiming for. I consider myself something of a video game soundtrack junkie and there is no question that Ni No Kuni’s soundtrack will not only be my next fix but one that gets frequent replaying in the years ahead.

Is it animated cutscene or is it actual gameplay? In Ni No Kuni sometimes it can be hard to tell.

Ni No Kuni is a very episodic game in a way that will immediately be familiar to anyone who has played a Level-5 title before. Few of these episodes are particularly original in and of themselves and overall the game lays out a tale that as previously stated is both simple and straightforward. Yet, this should not be viewed as a negative because Ni No Kuni also brims over with genuine emotion and affection. The writing is so expertly done that it has no trouble making what might have been an overly well-worn story feel fresh while also populating its world with characters who it is difficult to resist caring about and rooting for. It is an uplifting game that will bring a smile to all but the most hardened of hearts and once again is proof that familiarity does not always have to breed contempt. Add to this a healthy sense of humor, a fully realized and lore-stuffed world, plentiful content across a forty hour (at minimum) main quest, an expertly crafted combat system, and some of the best production values ever to be seen in a video game and you have what is the PS3 game to beat in the year ahead. While a few problems do rear their head at times, they all end up melting away as fairly minor road bumps in light of everything else the game gets right. In short, Ni No Kuni is the perfect blend for anyone who desires a game that is more concerned with sincerity and wearing its heart on its sleeve then being grim or overly cynical simply for the sake of being cool. What the game lacks in overt originality it more than makes for in sheer quality and it is a title I cannot recommend enough as deserving a place in any PS3 owner’s library.

A copy of the game was provided by the publisher for review purposes and played for 45 hours to completion. The game is a PS3 exclusive.

Also, feel free to follow the reviewer on Twitter @bigred_13 please if you feel so inclined.

9/10

Shinkara: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

A well-crafted JRPG mixed with Studio Ghibli style visuals seems like something only reserved for dreams. No need to keep pinching yourself because it's real. In this episode Taylor looks at the beautiful Level-5 & Studio Ghibli collaboration, Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch!

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Review

Is Ni No Kuni the title so many hoped it would be or has a seemingly cannot-fail mixing of creative forces done the unthinkable?
  1. January 26, 2013 at 08:56pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)

    Thus far I’m kinda underwhelmed. Interestingly enough I’m not underwhelmed cause of the reason I expected to be, the art and the game starring a kindergartner, but rather because of how clumsy the combat feels.

    Level-5, Square, and anyone else who wants to make an action/turn-based hybrid system.. please start adding a “block” or “dodge” or “defend” BUTTON. Not a command I have to fumble through menus to get to, just give me 1 button that lets me use my defense skill. I may not be tromping through Bayonetta on Non-Stop Infinite Climax, but my twitch skills are adequate enough to defend when I don’t have to psychically know I’m going to need to defend about 5 seconds beforehand.

  2. January 22, 2013 at 02:12am
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

    I pre-ordered this a loooong time ago. I’m insanely excited to play it. Great review. On a side note, I loved White Knight Chronicles. Guess I’m a weird one.

  3. January 21, 2013 at 09:34pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

    Just got a call from Gamestop that my preorder will be available tomorrow. A good thing I beat Tales of Graces f a few weeks ago

  4. January 21, 2013 at 08:37pm
    In response to Article
    VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
    Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)

    Man this game has been getting great scores all over the place!

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Ni No Kuni is AWESOME! - Episode 2

Posted in Video Games Awesome! [ 1 year, 1 month ]

Time to continue our adventure into the world of Ni No Kuni!

Ni No Kuni is AWESOME!

Posted in Video Games Awesome! [ 1 year, 2 months ]

A young boy named Oliver and his sidekick Drippy travel to another universe to save us all from destruction.

Shinkara: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

Posted in Shinkara [ 1 year, 2 months ]

A well-crafted JRPG mixed with Studio Ghibli style visuals seems like something only reserved for dreams. No need to keep pinching yourself because it’s real. In this episode Taylor looks at the beautiful Level-5 & Studio Ghibli collaboration, Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch!

The Pipeline - Ni no Kuni

Posted in Jew Wario [ 3 years, 4 months ]

JewWario brings back the Pipeline and focuses on a game that needs to come overseas.

PS3 25-in-25: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

Posted by [ 5 months ]

If you’re a JRPG fan then this is one you absolutely shouldn’t miss.

Ni No Kuni: Hands-on Preview

Posted by [ 1 year, 4 months ]

Our very own UK Content Editor Yousif A. gets hands on with the game that cast a Welshman as a fairy.

Hands-On: Ni no Kuni is Pure Joy

Posted by [ 1 year, 10 months ]

Ni no Kuni was one of the best things at E3 and will delight you in every way.

Ni no Kuni Chronicles: The Basics

Posted by [ 2 years, 3 months ]

Follow me on my journey as I chronicle my time with the Japanese version of Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch. Today, we get you caught up with the basics.